What Types of Food and Drinks Do Canadian Music Bars Serve?

Cocktail bars are all about mixology and offer a wide range of alcoholic drinks, from classic cocktails such as martinis, Manhattans, mojitos, and margaritas. As their customers tend to be younger, these bars focus mainly on selling alcohol. The food served, if any, is usually limited to snacks that are designed to encourage alcohol consumption. Salty nuts, olives, and other snacks are usually available, although some bars provide more substantial offerings such as tapas.

Waiters are trained in proper bar etiquette and may have sophisticated skills to mix drinks that surprise the crowd. In Canada, many bars and pubs cater to the fans of a local sports team, usually a hockey team. There is a difference between the sports bar and the pub; sports bars focus on television screens that show games and display uniforms, equipment, etc., while pubs usually also screen games but don't focus exclusively on them. The Tavern was popular until the early 1980s when American-style bars became popular.

In the 1990s, imitation British and Irish-style pubs became popular, with names such as The Fox and Fiddle and The Queen and Beaver reflecting naming trends in Britain. Mixed tavern or pub-type food and drink establishments are more common than bars in Canada, although both can be found. Depending on the size of the bar and its style, waiters can serve alcohol at the bar, waiters at tables, or a combination of both. Canadian provinces and territories impose legal restrictions on bars which has resulted in a wide variety of bars.

Live music is much more common in bars than in pubs, and some more exclusive venues hire their own band. Canadian bars are mostly long, dimly lit counters with some customers perched on the stools or surrounding tables and booths. The distinction between a restaurant that serves alcoholic beverages and a bar is usually made by the percentage of revenue earned from the sale of alcoholic beverages, although smoking is increasingly banned in bars. Bars that offer entertainment or live music are often referred to as musical bars, live venues, or nightclubs.

The owners and managers of a bar choose the name of the bar, the decor, the drinks menu, the lighting, and other items that they think will attract a certain type of customers. Some bars are similar to nightclubs in that they offer loud music, have dim lighting or apply a dress code and admission policy; bars in city centers often have doormen at the entrance. For example, a gay or lesbian bar with a dance floor or nightclub may over time attract an increasingly heterosexual clientele or a blues bar may become a biker bar if most of its customers are cyclists. Many Islamic countries prohibit bars as well as the possession or sale of alcohol for religious reasons while others such as Qatar and the United Arab Emirates allow bars in some specific areas but only allow non-Muslims to drink in them.

In the United Kingdom, bars are areas that serve alcoholic beverages in establishments such as hotels, restaurants or universities or are a particular type of establishment that serves alcoholic beverages such as wine bars style bars or private members-only bars. Traditionally many pubs had two or more bars most often the public bar or faucet room and the bar-lounge where the decoration was better and the prices were sometimes higher. These bars often offer entertainment which may consist of a live band a vocalist a comedian or a disc jockey playing recorded music. The types of bars range from cheap dive bars to elegant entertainment venues which often accompany restaurants for dinner.

Canadian music bars offer an array of food and drinks for their customers to enjoy while listening to live music performances. From classic cocktails like martinis to salty snacks like olives and nuts - there's something for everyone! Sports fans can find their favorite teams playing on television screens while those looking for an upscale experience can find private members-only clubs with live bands playing all night long.